“Regular” Products Iterate too…

Occasionally there is push back about the need to iterate on software projects. In fact just today I read a comment in a blog post that clearly stated “The only process that works is Waterfall – clearly define exactly what it is that the business wants, then figure out how you’re going to provide that and then build it” – well that’s a great idea – except around 9 times out of 10 we fail at the first step.

That’s not an isolated thought, it’s an honest one. Many people believe deep down inside that somehow iteration is failing1, or at the very least cheating and some people even call it waste.2

My Refrigerator

Those of you who sat with me at lunch on the last day of Agile Vietnam will know that I own a really nice refrigerator.3

Seriously, it’s amazing. It’s not just the best ‘fridge I’ve ever owned4, it’s one of the best products I’ve ever owned. Forget Apple, this thing just works.

And then I stopped to to compare it to the last fridge I had, and then the one before that – why were they not as unashamedly awesome? Why didn’t they just build fridges like this in 2008? 2003? 1977?

Basically because we didn’t know how…

Oh sure, we could keep stuff cool to frozen5 – and the door would open, and you could in theory see into it in the dark. But I’ve never loved a ‘fridge until now. I’ve never enjoyed using one before.

It’s probably important to point out at this point that I’m not talking about a massively expensive appliance here. The benefits are less to do with how much I’ve spent, and more to do with just how much refrigerator technology and design have come on since I last bought one.

The refrigerator has iterated.

Slowly I’ll grant you; but this is not a new product, it’s an iterative build on the product that came before it.
And that’s why it’s awesome.6

“Real” products – like ‘fridges, cars, dryers iterate. The products I have today are generally recognisable and serve largely the same core purpose, but they are not the same products by any margin as the ones my parents bought.

Refrigerator MVP

But it was not always thus. Visit any stately home in Europe and I’ll bet 9 out of 10 of them have a cellar, cool room or ice room.

Once upon a time (not that long ago – I bet it’s in the memory of your grandparents, if not your parents) – ice in a box was basically the state of the art.

Ice in a box was the MVP7 for home food cooling.

Granted, no single organisation ever owned the entire process from home ice delivery through to the French Doored, humidity controlled LED lit ‘fridge of my dreams, but the market as a whole certainly did (even if it took it the better part of 50-60 years)

Don’t fight the iteration, instead admire the speed

Once you accept that all products exist only to solve problems – to create outcomes desirable enough to pay for, you can clearly see that iteration is not a failure or a cheat – it’s basically the way in which the world works.

The difference with software is the speed at which we can accomplish this.

It’s not a failure to develop your software in an iterative fashion. It’s a privilege. An exciting time to be alive.

When we accept this process as natural we can take our ideas from blocks of ice to stainless steel wonders in a fraction of the time it took our forefathers.


  1. Who precisely is failing here however seems to rely entirely on your perspective. 
  2. Somewhat missing the point I know; but waste is both a tricky concept and an emotive word. 
  3. No kidding, I think we talked about my fridge for about an hour. I think it made us all feel cooler. I cannot for the life of me however remember how the subject came up in the first place. 
  4. One of the upsides of changing which country you live in every 5-10 years or so, is that you’re basically forced to upgrade your white goods. 
  5. Although I’d have to say that the majority of the freezer compartments I had in London operated around the concept of mostly frozen
  6. Imagine if people thought about their cars like they think about their smart phones – I hate this new Audi! It has the same form factor and user interface as the last one! Boooooring! I’m so going to switch to {insert brand here} car which moves the doors and steering system around every time they release a new one! 
  7. Minimal Viable Product 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *