Best for me, best for now (Practice)

In my last post, I covered the concept of “Best for Me” Practice.

In this post I want to extend that a little further into “Best for Me, Best for Now” (Practice).

The Tyranny of “Best”

“Best Practice” is often held up as a gold standard – something to aspire to, rather than to do.[1]

This leads broadly to two dysfunctions:

  1. Aiming too high
  2. Aiming too low

Aiming too high is akin to somebody who desires to increase their fitness through running and reads that “best practice” for fitness running is to run 5km, in under 45 minutes three or more times a week. They walk out onto the street, never having run a step in their life and hop to it.

Aiming too low is akin to somebody who reads the same advice and decides that “well, given that I’m 80kg overweight and struggle to walk down to the shops, I could never do that.”

Neither case is likely to ever reap the benefit. (And if it’s not obvious, aiming too high can rapidly lead to aiming too low, with a short bout of depression and self loathing in the middle)

Focussing on Outcomes, not Activities

Ultimately the real problem with Best Practice, is that it places the focus on the means and not the ends. There is a massive leap of faith that by doing this, we’ll get that. And if you’re not getting this fast enough (or at all) then just do that harder.

Rather than trying to run 15km a week, both our hypothetical couch potatoes would be better off taking on board a “Best for Me, Best for Now” approach.

The outcome they want is a longer healthier life; and the best first step is probably along the lines of:

  1. Walking a little more than they currently do
  2. Making some dietary changes
  3. Adding other physical activities that they enjoy and will sustain and won’t cause injury [2]
  4. Tracking some metrics – looking for correlations[3]

“Best” Practices, like MVP’s[4] should be considered as hypothesis

If you did those four things – then you would rapidly[5] become a different person with a different capability (and potentially even different goals).

And thus Best for you, Best for now would change.

And that’s a good thing.


  1. And if it is seen as something to do, then often the question turns to why aren’t you doing it now?!  ↩

  2. When you focus on the outcome, you free yourself up to explore other alternate paths to reaching it. Running is a way to get exercise, it’s not the only way. Considering that when it comes to weight loss, exercise is more about improving mood than it is about burning calories, it’s doubly pointless to do something that you don’t enjoy.  ↩

  3. Perhaps measuring this with a FitBit and some bathroom scales. Noticing that on the weeks they walk more, they lose or at the very least maintain their weight and feel better to boot.  ↩

  4. Minimal Viable Product  ↩

  5. OK, this would depend also on your age, starting weight and whether or not you had any pre-existing glandular or metabolic conditions, but hopefully you get my point.  ↩

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